two new hires

WFY Welcomes Two New Hires to Audit Department

This month, Wright Ford Young & Co. is pleased to announce we have two new hires joining our team. Mimi Duong will be joining as an Audit Staff and Lauren Gilmour will be joining as an Audit Intern in our audit department. WFY is pleased to welcome these new hires to our team.

Mimi Duong

At the end of May, Mimi Duong started a position with WFY as Audit Staff.  She will be graduating CSUF later this year with a Business Administration degree with a concentration in Accounting.  In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with friends and family, experimenting with makeup, and trying new foods.

Lauren Gilmour

Lauren Gilmour joined WFY as an Audit Intern in May. She is currently attending USC as a Junior, and this will be her first experience working at a CPA firm.  Other than attending her classes, she loves to hike, go to the beach, and be outdoors.

 

Interested in joining WFY in one of our departments? Please email your resumes careers@cpa-wfy.com or go to our Careers page.

 

roth ira

Roth IRA Conversion During Coronavirus – Is Now the Right Time?

By Cheryl Shelton, JD

Wright Ford Young & Co., CPAs

 

Roth IRA’s have two big tax advantages:  Tax-free withdrawals and exemption from required minimum distributions.  But converting a traditional IRA into a Roth IRA is a taxable distribution.  While in the midst of the coronavirus, is 2020 the right time to make the conversion?

Here are some reasons why it might be the ideal time to do a complete or partial conversion:

  • Low tax rates
  • Stock market decline
  • Reduced income

The tax rates are the lowest they have been in a while due to the TCJA (they are scheduled to last through 2025).  If your tax rate during retirement will be the same or higher than your current rate, then considering a conversion now may be a good idea for you.

It’s in the news every day; the stock market is down more than usual.  But this could be another good reason to make the conversion to a Roth IRA.  You’ll pay taxes on the current value of the pre-tax assets being converted, which would be lower because of reduced share prices.   In the future when we all return to normal and the market rebounds, you’ll enjoy tax-free growth potential and tax-free withdrawal of the assets.

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, you may be anticipating your income for 2020 to be much lower than the previous year. This could put you in a lower tax bracket for the current tax year.  If so, the tax required to be paid on the conversion could be significantly lower.

Completing a Roth IRA conversion when tax rates are lower and the market is down may save you money on the taxes due upon conversion.  Therefore, this might be the ideal time to consider the tax advantages of converting your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.

If you would like to explore whether a Roth IRA conversion is right for you, please contact your WFY advisor or contact us here.

© Copyright 2020. All rights reserved.

gifting

Why Gifting During an Economic Downturn May Be Right for You

Janelle Tokunaga, CPA, MST

Wright Ford Young & Co., CPAs

 

While it may seem like there has been a shortage of good news lately, we wanted to bring your attention to a few bright spots that have come about during our current economic downturn.  With the extra time you have at  sheltering in place, it may be a good time to revisit your current estate and gift plan.

To recap: the 2020 Federal lifetime exemption is $11.58 million per person, including inflation, and the 2020 annual Federal gift exclusion is $15,000 per donee and donor.  The current economic market is showing decreased values in the public securities arena and lower overall real estate values in light of the COVID-19 environment.

The current lifetime exemption gives you the opportunity to make larger gifts of assets. But when combined with lower current asset values you can gift now with less exemption utilization, it leaves more exemption available for future gifts.  So, now, may be a good time to think about gifting those depressed value assets that are expected to increase considerably in the future. Then, when the markets eventually recovers and your gifted asset values increase, they will already be outside of your taxable estate.

If you aren’t ready to gift assets directly, setting up and transferring ownership of real estate and marketable securities into closely held entities (such as FLPs and LLCs) may be a good option as well.

We encourage you to use this unique time to reflect on your current estate plan. Considering whether gifting is something for you may benefit you and your loved ones now and in the future.  WFY advisors are available to discuss the tax benefits of gifting during our economic downturn and look forward to hearing from you. If you’d like to contact us, click here.

© Copyright 2020. All rights reserved.

ppp

Non-Deductibility of PPP Related Expenses to the Extent of Forgiven PPP Funds (IRS Notice 2020-32)

Janet Kim, CPA, MST

Wright Ford Young & Co., CPAs

 

The IRS released Notice 2020-32 on April 30, 2020, which provides guidance on the deductibility of expenses paid with Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan proceeds that are forgiven and excluded from the borrower’s income. The IRS has determined otherwise deductible expenses that are paid with PPP funds may not be deductible for federal income tax purposes to the extent the expenses were reimbursed by a PPP loan that was then forgiven.

The PPP was created by Section 1106 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). Under the PPP, the borrower can receive forgiveness of indebtedness in the amount equal to the sum of payments made for the following expenses during the 8-week “covered period” beginning on the covered loan’s origination date: payroll costs, mortgage interest, rent, and utilities during the COVID-19 crisis. The forgiven amount is excluded from gross income under the PPP. The IRS notice explains that to the extent that Sec 1106 excludes from gross income the amount of a covered loan forgiven, this results in a “class of exempt income” under Sec. 265 which disallows otherwise allowable deduction for the amount of covered loan forgiveness because such payment is allowable to tax-exempt income. This treatment prevents a double tax benefit.

The CARES Act did not address whether deductions otherwise allowable under the Code for payments of eligible Section 1106 expenses paid by the PPP borrowers are allowable if the covered loan is subsequently forgiven as a result of the payment of those expenses. According to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley “the intent was to maximize small businesses’ ability to maintain liquidity, retain their employees and recover from this health crisis as quickly as possible, this notice is contrary to that intent.” It may take clarification in a future bill if the original intent of Congress is that these expenses remain tax deductible.

We continue to monitor all newly issued legislation and guidance to assist you in making informed decisions.  If you have any questions or concerns regarding this latest guidance, please contact your WFY advisor or contact us here.