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ppp

SBA Releases PPP Flexibility Act Guidance and Revised Forgiveness Application Form

ppp

Richard A. Huffman, CPA, MST
Wright Ford Young & Co., CPAs

The Small Business Administration has released additional Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) guidance and revised the forgiveness application form to align with the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act which was signed into law on June 5, 2020. Highlights of the updates are as follows:

1. For non-owners included compensation is 24 weeks of compensation up to $100,000 with a maximum per employee amount of $46,154.
2. For owners (S and C corporation owner-employees, self-employed individuals and general partners) the included compensation is the lesser of 2.5 months of 2019 compensation or $20,833.
3. Employer paid health insurance is only included for non-owners, excluded for all owners.
4. Employer paid retirement plan contributions are included for employees (including S and C Corporation owner-employees) but excluded for self-employed individuals and general partners.
5. Clarified that if less than 60% of the loan proceeds are utilized for payroll costs, the amount qualifying for forgiveness will be incrementally reduced.
6. There is a new EZ application for forgiveness that requires fewer calculations and can be utilized if meet certain criteria.

If you have not yet applied, PPP funds are still available with an application deadline of June 30, 2020.

For additional information or guidance regarding the Paycheck Protection Program, please contact your WFY advisor or contact us here.
© Copyright 2020. All rights reserved.

two new hires

WFY Welcomes Two New Hires to Audit Department

This month, Wright Ford Young & Co. is pleased to announce we have two new hires joining our team. Mimi Duong will be joining as an Audit Staff and Lauren Gilmour will be joining as an Audit Intern in our audit department. WFY is pleased to welcome these new hires to our team.

Mimi Duong

At the end of May, Mimi Duong started a position with WFY as Audit Staff.  She will be graduating CSUF later this year with a Business Administration degree with a concentration in Accounting.  In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with friends and family, experimenting with makeup, and trying new foods.

Lauren Gilmour

Lauren Gilmour joined WFY as an Audit Intern in May. She is currently attending USC as a Junior, and this will be her first experience working at a CPA firm.  Other than attending her classes, she loves to hike, go to the beach, and be outdoors.

 

Interested in joining WFY in one of our departments? Please email your resumes careers@cpa-wfy.com or go to our Careers page.

 

angels game

WFY Attends Anaheim Angels Game

On Saturday, August 17th, Wright Ford Young & Co. attended the Anaheim Angels vs. Chicago White Sox game at the Angel Stadium in Anaheim.

Our audit, tax, and all other departments came together to celebrate one of our core values: we have fun!  About 150 friends, family, and employees of WFY attended the exciting game during a perfect day for baseball. Everyone enjoyed the game with popcorn, hot dogs, nachos, and other delicious baseball game treats.

The game started off slow with a tied game by the end of the 2nd inning, but the White Sox took a 4-1 lead by the end of the 3rd inning. The 7th inning came and the Angels scored three runs to get them to a 6-5 lead.  At the top of the 9th inning, the White Sox couldn’t lock down any more runs which ended with an Anaheim Angels victory.

A special thanks to our Partners Kahni Bizub and Jeff Myers for putting this special event together for WFY.

If you’d like to check out upcoming Anaheim Angels games, you can check them out here.

calcpa

Cyndi LeBerthon Appointed Chair of CalCPA Peer Review Committee

Wright Ford Young & Co.’s Audit Partner, Cyndi LeBerthon, has been appointed Chair of the CalCPA Peer Review Committee for the term 2019 through 2021.

This committee of 20 members is responsible for overseeing all peer reviews of CPA firms in California, Arizona and Alaska administered by CalCPA. The peer review committee evaluates the results of the peer reviews, determines the need for follow up remedial or corrective actions, and oversees the performance of AICPA qualified peer reviewers in California, Arizona and Alaska. These measures taken ensure compliance with the AICPA Peer Review Program. Cyndi has served on the peer review committee since 2015 and is honored to be able to give back to the accounting profession through this volunteer, invitation-only role.

Congratulations, Cyndi!

If you’d like to learn more about WFY’s Audit Partner, Cyndi LeBerthon, click here.

tax season CPA discussion

The Problems Faced Between You and Your Current CPA This Past Tax Season

Once the corporate, individual and foundation tax reporting season is complete, there’s always an opportunity to evaluate and reassess the taxpayer’s level of satisfaction with their CPA relationship. Lack of communication, unwanted tax return extensions, incorrectly prepared Schedule K-1’s, and inability to accurately apply the qualified TCJA reform benefits  are just a few of the many frustrations that may have been experienced this past tax season.

Situations can arise in a taxpayer-CPA relationship which makes a taxpayer to question whether or not their current accounting firm is the right fit for them.  Small to mid sized closely held companies and family business owners may feel as though they have outgrown their small practice CPA or might feel under served by their larger accounting firm.  Some of the common situations where Wright Ford Young is referred into a new client relationship have been:

  • Delayed responses from their current CPA or lack of follow up communication that caused their tax returns to be unnecessarily extended.
  • Excessive turnover of accounting firm staff that caused the need for re-training and more work to be completed by company employees.
  • Need for new growth capital, loan or line of credit that requires a company’s financial statements to be audited, reviewed or compiled for the first time.
  • When a company’s employee benefit plan exceeds 100 participants for the first time, thus requiring a qualified ERISA auditor to audit the plan (i.e. 401(k)).
  • When a business owner considers a liquidity event, yet doesn’t want to fully exit the business, the consideration of structuring a tax-friendly ESOP is warranted.
  • The need for a family business owner to take advantage of the new tax strategies relating to personal estate and trust planning.
  • Anytime a company financial leader or family business owner no longer sees a true correlation between the accounting fee they pay and the value of service they receive.

If you are a small to mid-sized company or family business owner who is dissatisfied with your current accounting firm, please contact Wright Ford Young to schedule a no-obligation conversation with one of our audit, tax, or estates and trusts planning specialists.

Spend some time getting to know us and you’ll see how you can achieve compliance without feeling like a number in a “check the box” environment.

Learn how a proactive year-round tax strategy can serve as a valuable improvement vehicle to your profitability, not just a tax time expense.

Understand why estate planning is critical to maximizing your wealth preservation while you are still able to fully enjoy life with your family, not after.

See how our partners and staff are hands-on and better equipped to respond to individual requests from all our clients and not shielded with layers of staff, and realize a true correlation between the fee you pay and the value of service you actually receive.

New Partnership Audit Rules for 2018 Tax Filing Year

For the 2018 tax filing year, there are new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) partnership audit rules [also adopted by the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB)] in which the partnership, not its members, will now be responsible for tax adjustments under audit.

There is a very narrowly defined opt-out provision that many partnerships do not qualify for.  Please consider amending the partnership operating agreement to designate a “partnership representative” to represent the company in disputes with the IRS or the FTB.  Also, you should consider including language regarding the responsibility of tax audit adjustments pursuant to the three allowable methods: “amend”, “pull in”, and “push out.”

Below is a chart which discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

MethodProsCons
Election OutPartnership out of CPARLimited to small partnerships with limited kinds of partners
Must elect on annual basis
AmendSimple to implementPartnership can’t compel partners to amend

Partnership can’t monitor who amends and who doesn’t

Pull InSimple to implement

Partnership can act as clearing house for convenience of partners (allows partnership to monitor which partners have pulled in)

Partnership can’t compel partners to pull in
Push OutPartnership can compel reviewed-year partners to pay tax on their share of imputed underpaymentShort time frame to elect and comply

Large administrative burdern on partnership

Partners pay additional 2% penalty

To discuss your situation under the new partnership audit rules, please contact a WFY tax expert at (949) 910-2727 or info@cpa-wfy.com

© Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

New IRS Partnership Audit Rules Prompt New Look at Operating Agreement

The IRS introduced a new set of partnership auditing rules which take effect in the financial year 2018 and are meant to make it easier for the agency to uncover and collect underpaid taxes from partnership entities.  The previous audit system was challenging for the IRS because it was difficult to pin down who owed the tax under a complex partnership structure.

Small partnerships with less than 100 members can opt out if no partner is a pass-through entity.

The IRS will begin reviewing tax filings in line with the new procedure in 2019, so audits could start as soon as 2020.

When a partnership underpays its taxes, the leftover bill has to be dealt with by a designated individual. If a partnership fails to make that designation, the IRS will select one on its behalf. Designating a representative to deal with the IRS if and when an audit arises could benefit partnerships from having the IRS select one for them.  The IRS promised that it won’t designate its own employees, agents, or contractors.

A partnership without a designated representative may end up relying on outside legal counsel to contact what could be hundreds of partners to determine the needed tax adjustments. Re-evaluating a partnership agreement that has been working all this time is hard to sort out, but it comes down to the potential cost in legal fees in sorting the issue that could possibly come up down the road.

To discuss your situation under the new audit regime, please contact Wright Ford Young & Co. at (949) 910-2727 or info@cpa-wfy.com

© Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

Making Large Gifts Now Won’t Harm Estates After 2025

On November 20th, the IRS announced individuals taking advantage of the increased gift and estate tax exclusion amounts in effect from 2018 to 2025 will not be adversely impacted after 2025 when the exclusion amount is scheduled to drop to levels before 2018.

The Treasury Department and the IRS issued proposed regulations which implement changes made by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).  As a result, individuals planning to make large gifts between 2018 and 2025 can do so without concern that they will lose the tax benefit of the higher exclusion level once it decreases after 2025.

In general, gift and estate taxes are calculated, using a unified rate schedule, on taxable transfers of money, property and other assets. Any tax due is determined after applying a credit – formerly known as the unified credit – based on an applicable exclusion amount.

The applicable exclusion amount is the sum of the basic exclusion amount (BEA) established in the statute, and other elements (if applicable) described in the proposed regulations. The credit is first used during life to offset gift tax and any remaining credit is available to reduce or eliminate estate tax.

The TCJA temporarily increased the BEA from $5 million to $10 million for tax years 2018 through 2025, with both dollar amounts adjusted for inflation. For 2018, the inflation-adjusted BEA is $11.18 million. In 2026, the BEA will revert to the 2017 level of $5 million as adjusted for inflation.

To address concerns that an estate tax could apply to gifts exempt from gift tax by the increased BEA, the proposed regulations provide a special rule that allows the estate to compute its estate tax credit using the higher of the BEA applicable to gifts made during life or the BEA applicable on the date of death.

To discuss more about your gift and estate tax situation, contact WFY’s Estates and Trusts Partners, Marisa Alvarado and Kevin Wiest, at info@cpa-wfy.com or (949) 910-2727.

© Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

Tax Saving Moves to Improve Your Tax Situation

Since 2018 is coming to a close now is the time to take action to proactively reduce your tax liability before the new year.  Included are a few strategies that may help with your tax situation:

  1. Harvest stock losses while substantially preserving one’s investment position. This can be accomplished by selling the shares and buying other shares in the same company or another company in the same industry to replace them, or by selling the original shares, then buying back the same securities at least 31 days later.
  2. Apply a bunching strategy to deductible contributions and/or payments of medical expenses. Beginning in 2018 the standard deduction has been increased and the itemized deduction of state and local taxes limited to $10,000 which will cause many taxpayers to lose the benefit of their itemized deductions. By bunching multiple years of charitable contributions and medical expenses into one year a taxpayer may create a taxable benefit that would not otherwise exist.  For example, a taxpayer who expects to itemize deductions in 2018 and usually contributes a total of $10,000 to charities each year, should consider refunding 2019 and 2020 charitable contributions by contributing a total of $30,000 into a donor advised charitable fund and then distribute the funds to the charities over the following two years.
  3. Take required minimum distributions (RMDs). Taxpayers who have reached age 70-½ should be sure to take their 2018 RMD from their IRAs or 401(k) plans (or other employer-sponsored retired plans). Failure to take a required withdrawal can result in a penalty of 50% of the amount of the RMD not withdrawn. Those who turned age 70-½ in 2018 can delay the first required distribution to 2019, however, this can result in taking a double distribution in 2019 (the required amount for 2018 and 2019).
  4. Use IRAs to make charitable gifts. Taxpayers who have reached age 70-½, own IRAs, and are thinking of making a charitable gift should consider arranging for the gift to be made by way of a qualified charitable contribution, or QCD—a direct transfer from the IRA trustee to the charitable organization. Such a transfer (not to exceed $100,000) will neither be included in gross income nor allowed as a deduction on the taxpayer’s return. A qualified charitable contribution before year end is a particularly good idea for retired taxpayers who don’t need all of their as-yet undistributed RMD for living expenses.
  5. Make year-end gifts. A person can give any other person up to $15,000 for 2018 without incurring any gift tax. The annual exclusion amount increases to $30,000 per donee if the donor’s spouse consents to gift-splitting. Anyone who expects eventually to have estate tax liability and who can afford to make gifts to family members should do so.

These are broad suggestions that will benefit some but not all taxpayers.  To discuss and create a personalized tax strategy be sure to contact a WFY tax specialist at info@cpa-wfy.com or (949) 910-2727.

© Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

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WFY Welcomes New Partner Cyndi LeBerthon

Wright Ford Young & Co. would like to welcome our newest addition to the firm: Cyndi LeBerthon, CPA.  With more than 15 years of public accounting experience, Cyndi has joined WFY as Partner in the Audit Department.

Cyndi is responsible for planning and supervising audit and review engagements in a wide range of industries, including distribution, manufacturing, professional service, technology and hospitality.  Having extensive experience in Employee Benefit Plan audits and ERISA regulations, she also works with plan sponsors in private and public sectors performing annual DOL required audits of their 401(k), 403(b), ESOP, and Pension and Welfare Benefit Plans.

Cyndi is an AICPA authorized peer reviewer and works with other CPA firms throughout California and Arizona, performing their peer reviews and providing consultant services on quality control.  She is also a committee member of the CalCPA Peer Review Committee.   This committee has oversight responsibilities of all peer reviews performed throughout California, Arizona and Alaska.

To learn more about Cyndi LeBerthon, go to https://www.cpa-wfy.com/staging.cpa-wfy.com/dev/who-we-are/practice-leaders/cyndi-leberthon/