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Landmark SCOTUS Decision on Sales Tax Collection Requirements

The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued a ruling that could have a dramatic impact on American retailers, and not only those who primarily operate on the Internet.  In what has been called the Wayfair sales tax case, the court on June 21, 2 018 said that states can impose sales taxes on businesses even if they do not have a physical presence in the state.

The ruling effectively overturns Quill Corp. v. North Dakota, which was a Supreme Court decision handed down in 1992.  In that case, the court said that the Commerce Clause in the U.S. Constitution forbids states from imposing sales tax on companies without a physical presence.  The court said that states could only impose sales tax on a company if it had an actual location in the state, or if it had another bright-line physical presence, such as in-state employees, inventory, or sales representative in the state.

South Dakota, in the Wayfair sales tax case, bypassed interstate commerce restrictions in a law that it enacted back in 2016, called S. B. 106. Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the majority decision for the court in this case, said that the South Dakota law was constitutional because of the following reasons:

  • The law allows out-of-state companies to be exempt from sales taxes if they only do limited business in the state. That is, if they have less than $100,000 in sales revenue and less than 200 transactions in a calendar year;
  • The law does not try to collect sales tax retroactively; and
  • South Dakota abides by the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement, which reduces compliance and administrative costs associated with collecting sales tax.

Essentially, the court allowed South Dakota to collect sales taxes from Internet retailers because its law did not place a significant burden on interstate commerce.  Currently, 31 states have laws that impose sales taxes based on economic, as opposed to physical presence nexus standards. While it is possible that not all these laws pass the standard set by Wayfair, the court has now given them guidance toward making their laws constitutional.  Furthermore, it can be expected that other states will impose similar laws in the future.

On the federal level, there are two bills currently making their way through congress that will let states impose sales taxes on out-of-state entities.  Both the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) and the Remote Transactions Parity Act (RTPA) allow states to collect sales taxes if they keep the process of paying the taxes simple.

Because of the court’s decision, it is important for retailers selling into multiple states to understand in which states it has sales tax obligations, which will require it to both register and file taxes in these states.  Fortunately, if your business operates in multiple states, you do not have to figure all this out by yourself.

If you have questions regarding your sales tax filing requirements, please call 949-910-2727 or email info@cpa-wfy.com.

© Copyright 2018. All rights reserved. 

California Competes Tax Credit

The California Competes Tax Credit is an income tax credit for businesses wanting to stay and grow in California. The purpose is to attract and retain employers in California industries with high economic multipliers and that provide their employees good wages and benefits. Any business can apply.

The credit applies to any type of business expecting to increase headcount and/or make a capital investment in California.  Businesses compete for these tax credits by asking for a percentage return on investment.

California plans to grant $230 Million in Cal Competes tax credits to California businesses over three separate application rounds in 2018.  Typically, a business can get up to 20% ROI.

If you think your company may qualify for this tax credit and would like to learn more about how to take advantage of this cost savings opportunity, please contact us today at srobinson@cpa-wfy.com or call 949-910-2727.

© Copyright 2018. All rights reserved. 

WFY Expands Firm with Three New Hires

Wright Ford Young & Co. continues to grow the firm with three new hires: Andrew Abeyta, Cameron Lee, and Jennifer Nguyen.  All three are the newest additions to WFY’s Tax Department.  WFY is pleased to welcome these new hires to the WFY team.

Andrew Abeyta

In the beginning of July, Wright Ford Young & Co. welcomed Andrew Abeyta as Tax Staff. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton in 2016 and jumped into public accounting straight after that. Andrew’s previous experience in accounting includes working at another CPA firm after college. In his spare time, he’s passionate about photography and teaches 5th & 6th grade Sunday school at his church.

Cameron Lee

This month, Wright Ford Young & Co. had the pleasure of adding Cameron Lee as one of the newest Tax Staff. Before coming to WFY, Cameron graduated from Cal State Fullerton with his Bachelor’s degree in accounting, worked as an intern at another tax firm and worked in finance as a loan officer. Outside of the office, he enjoys volunteering and playing in a city basketball league.

Jennifer Nguyen

In mid-July, Jennifer Nguyen joined the Wright Ford Young & Co. team as a Tax Intern. She’s currently a senior at Cal State Fullerton and plans to graduate this fall with a degree in Business Administration with an emphasis on Accounting. Jennifer’s previous tax experience includes working as a Tax Administrative Assistant at a family office for 2 years. In her spare time, she likes volunteering and fostering cats from OC Animal Care in Tustin.

What Is an Offer in Compromise with the IRS?

An offer in compromise can make you happy: “Oh boy, the IRS said yes, and my tax debts are over!” Or it can frustrate you. Let’s go over how to navigate the IRS settlement guidelines and see what an OIC entails.

Here’s the good news:

  • An OIC can be a fresh start from your IRS debt.
  • You no longer have to worry that the IRS will seize your wages or bank accounts.
  • Your credit score will no longer show any tax liens against you — the IRS releases them all.
  • IRS collections are put on hold and the compromise is investigated. And then — peace, ah, peace — from IRS certified-mail letters and visits from IRS revenue officers.
  • You put the debt behind you and you can go back to saving for retirement.

But here’s some of the bad news:

  • The IRS will dig deeply into your finances.
  • You have to tell the IRS where you work and bank and you must list your assets, including your house, cars, valuables and retirement accounts.
  • The IRS will look at your paystubs, tax returns, bank statements, business profit and loss statements and proof of payment of monthly bills.
  • After acceptance of the OIC, the IRS will put you on a five-year probation, requiring full compliance in filing and paying taxes. Not playing ball with all IRS expectations will default the settlement.

But wait! It gets even more dicey:

  • An OIC is not a quick fix — it can take the IRS a minimum of nine to 12 months to investigate, and another six months if an appeal is needed. The IRS allows five to 24 months to pay the settlement.
  • If you want to pay credit card, mortgage or car loan monthly bills, think again. The IRS may effectively take over your budgeting.
  • If the IRS determines it can collect what you owe, it will reject your offer, but you can appeal.
  • The settlement amount is not based on fairness, but on collectability.
  • It may not work at all! The IRS recently rejected 60 percent of the offers it received: 41,000 rejections out of a pool of 68,000 submissions!

Let’s see where that leaves us:

  • An OIC can be a wonderful way to rid yourself of the IRS bugging you.
  • You need to consider it from all angles to make sure it’s the right move for you.

A compromise is not the only way to clear the IRS out of your life. The agency can agree that you owe debt, but not force you to repay it — the IRS terms it currently uncollectible and puts you in its bad debt category and leaves you alone. The IRS has 10 years to collect the taxes. You could let the time frame expire rather than compromising. Bankruptcy may be able to eliminate taxes too. See what’s in your best interest.

The point is that you have options, and you should talk to a professional if you’re having tax problems.

© Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.