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lawyers for warriors

WFY Title Sponsors Veterans Legal Institute’s Lawyers for Warriors Event

Wright Ford Young & Co. had the privilege of serving as the title sponsor to the Veterans Legal Institute’s annual Lawyers for Warriors event on Monday, September 23rd.  Senior audit partner Jeff Myers spoke on Wright Ford Young’s behalf to honor our ongoing partnership with the Veterans Legal Institute.

Lawyers for Warriors is an event that started four years ago where over 250 business leaders who represent legal, medical, financial, military, and other professional industries can network, enjoy wine and appetizers, and recognize those legal community leaders who have graciously offered their services to our veteran heroes.  All the proceeds of this event go to Veterans Legal Institute to continue their mission to ensure veterans can receive free legal services.

We want to congratulate the following people for their awards at this event: Stephens Friedland, LLP for Law Firm of the Year, Volunteers of America Los Angeles for Community Partner of the Year, Judge Lon F. Hurwitz for Veteran Advocate of the Year, and David Price, Esq. for Attorney of the Year.

If you’d like to learn more about Veterans Legal Institute or the Lawyers for Warriors event, please go to https://www.vetslegal.com/

 

meet the firms

WFY Attends Meet the Firms at CSUF and NAU

On Thursday, September 26th, a group of our Wright Ford Young & Co. employees attended California State University, Fullerton’s Meet the Firms event as well as Northern Arizona University’s Career & Graduate School Expo.

These type of meet and greet events are a way for students and professionals in the accounting community to network with a wide range of firms from boutique to the Big Four.  We attend these events to educate students about WFY and what we do, and encourage them to get a hands-on learning experience with our firm.

Wright Ford Young & Co. thanks California State University, Fullerton and Northern Arizona University for another great Meet the Firms recruiting event on Thursday, September 26th.  We are very fortunate to have a long standing relationship with the accounting schools and hardworking students in which many of our employees are alumni.

 

angels game

WFY Attends Anaheim Angels Game

On Saturday, August 17th, Wright Ford Young & Co. attended the Anaheim Angels vs. Chicago White Sox game at the Angel Stadium in Anaheim.

Our audit, tax, and all other departments came together to celebrate one of our core values: we have fun!  About 150 friends, family, and employees of WFY attended the exciting game during a perfect day for baseball. Everyone enjoyed the game with popcorn, hot dogs, nachos, and other delicious baseball game treats.

The game started off slow with a tied game by the end of the 2nd inning, but the White Sox took a 4-1 lead by the end of the 3rd inning. The 7th inning came and the Angels scored three runs to get them to a 6-5 lead.  At the top of the 9th inning, the White Sox couldn’t lock down any more runs which ended with an Anaheim Angels victory.

A special thanks to our Partners Kahni Bizub and Jeff Myers for putting this special event together for WFY.

If you’d like to check out upcoming Anaheim Angels games, you can check them out here.

legacy luncheon

E&T Partner Marisa Alvarado Panels OCCF’s 2019 Legacy Luncheon

On June 12th, our Estates & Trusts Senior Tax Partner, Marisa Alvarado, and some of WFY’s other Estates & Trusts staff attended Orange County Community Foundation’s 2019 Legacy Luncheon at the Pacific Club with many other philanthropists and professional advisors.

The luncheon consisted of learning about other women in philanthropy and acquiring tips to make the most of their charitable planning.  More than 100 people gathered for the event to listen to a panel discussion about charitable planning which Marisa Alvarado was a panelist.

OCCF is a foundation that works with individuals, families and businesses to match charitable interests to community needs and provide grants and resources to nonprofits and monitor local issues. The foundation has also granted more than $560 million to dreamers and doers motivated by their passion for a wide range of causes and issues.

To learn more about the Legacy Luncheon and OCCF, go to OCFF’s website.

 

law

CA Governor Signed Law to Conform to Federal Tax Law Changes

The California governor signed law AB 91, also known as the “Loophole Closure and Small Business and Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” which partially conforms to certain provisions of the Federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, some of the significant items are as follows:

  • Small business accounting method reform and simplification
    • Allow businesses with average gross receipts less than $25 million to adopt the cash method of accounting
  • Net operating losses
    • Only allow net operating loss carryforwards

The new California law does not conform to:

  • Opportunity zone gain deferrals and capital gain exclusions
  • Fringe benefit federal deduction limitations
    • Convenience of employer meals
    • Entertainment
    • Parking and transportation

Although the law goes into effect for many of the provisions starting in 2019, certain provisions can be elected to apply to 2018.

To discuss how best to apply these changes to your situation, please contact a WFY tax expert at (949) 910-2727 or info@cpa-wfy.com.

© Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

calcpa

Cyndi LeBerthon Appointed Chair of CalCPA Peer Review Committee

Wright Ford Young & Co.’s Audit Partner, Cyndi LeBerthon, has been appointed Chair of the CalCPA Peer Review Committee for the term 2019 through 2021.

This committee of 20 members is responsible for overseeing all peer reviews of CPA firms in California, Arizona and Alaska administered by CalCPA. The peer review committee evaluates the results of the peer reviews, determines the need for follow up remedial or corrective actions, and oversees the performance of AICPA qualified peer reviewers in California, Arizona and Alaska. These measures taken ensure compliance with the AICPA Peer Review Program. Cyndi has served on the peer review committee since 2015 and is honored to be able to give back to the accounting profession through this volunteer, invitation-only role.

Congratulations, Cyndi!

If you’d like to learn more about WFY’s Audit Partner, Cyndi LeBerthon, click here.

WFY Tax Department is Hiring

Wright Ford Young & Co. is seeking qualified candidates to join our tax department team! We are looking for hard-working, dedicated people who are willing to learn and flourish in their careers.  Full-time positions are available for the following departments:

Tax Department

  • Tax Professional (at least 3 years of experience)

If you are interested and qualified for the position above, please email your resumes careers@cpa-wfy.com or go to our Careers page.

tax season CPA discussion

The Problems Faced Between You and Your Current CPA This Past Tax Season

Once the corporate, individual and foundation tax reporting season is complete, there’s always an opportunity to evaluate and reassess the taxpayer’s level of satisfaction with their CPA relationship. Lack of communication, unwanted tax return extensions, incorrectly prepared Schedule K-1’s, and inability to accurately apply the qualified TCJA reform benefits  are just a few of the many frustrations that may have been experienced this past tax season.

Situations can arise in a taxpayer-CPA relationship which makes a taxpayer to question whether or not their current accounting firm is the right fit for them.  Small to mid sized closely held companies and family business owners may feel as though they have outgrown their small practice CPA or might feel under served by their larger accounting firm.  Some of the common situations where Wright Ford Young is referred into a new client relationship have been:

  • Delayed responses from their current CPA or lack of follow up communication that caused their tax returns to be unnecessarily extended.
  • Excessive turnover of accounting firm staff that caused the need for re-training and more work to be completed by company employees.
  • Need for new growth capital, loan or line of credit that requires a company’s financial statements to be audited, reviewed or compiled for the first time.
  • When a company’s employee benefit plan exceeds 100 participants for the first time, thus requiring a qualified ERISA auditor to audit the plan (i.e. 401(k)).
  • When a business owner considers a liquidity event, yet doesn’t want to fully exit the business, the consideration of structuring a tax-friendly ESOP is warranted.
  • The need for a family business owner to take advantage of the new tax strategies relating to personal estate and trust planning.
  • Anytime a company financial leader or family business owner no longer sees a true correlation between the accounting fee they pay and the value of service they receive.

If you are a small to mid-sized company or family business owner who is dissatisfied with your current accounting firm, please contact Wright Ford Young to schedule a no-obligation conversation with one of our audit, tax, or estates and trusts planning specialists.

Spend some time getting to know us and you’ll see how you can achieve compliance without feeling like a number in a “check the box” environment.

Learn how a proactive year-round tax strategy can serve as a valuable improvement vehicle to your profitability, not just a tax time expense.

Understand why estate planning is critical to maximizing your wealth preservation while you are still able to fully enjoy life with your family, not after.

See how our partners and staff are hands-on and better equipped to respond to individual requests from all our clients and not shielded with layers of staff, and realize a true correlation between the fee you pay and the value of service you actually receive.

WFY Hosts MGI North America West Coast Area Meeting

On January 4th, Wright Ford Young & Co. hosted the MGI North America West Coast Area Meeting at our offices in Irvine, CA.

Joe Tarasco, Regional Director, and Nancy Damato, Director of Marketing, starting the meeting off by talking about key points such as MGI North America new member recruiting initiatives and activities, marketing assessment calls/web meetings with MGI North America members, a guide about foreign companies doing business in United States, and upcoming conferences.

The meeting continued with discussions concentrating on MGI firm collaboration and practice management updates along with topics including business development, technical and niche areas, succession planning, and more.

Our WFY Tax Partner, Andy Bautista, hosted the meeting and said, “It was a great day spent with colleagues and friends, sharing ideas and ‘best practices,’ as well as networking and socializing. The meeting served as a reminder of how proud the respective firms are to be part of the MGI Worldwide network.”

Wright Ford Young & Co. is a member of MGI Worldwide, a Top 20 international accounting network of independent audit, tax and accounting firms, which brings together the expertise of some 6,000 professionals in over 300 locations around the world.  Through MGI Worldwide, our firm benefits from connections with people we get to know and trust in all corners of the globe.

When Does a Resident Become a Nonresident?

According to a recent SFGate poll, 53% of Bay Area residents interviewed want to leave California.(1) We have been hearing similar comments from seminar attendees across the state, and we know many of you have clients who are attempting to “move out of California.”

Keep in mind, one of the FTB’s longest running, and most active, audit programs is the residency audit program. The FTB looks closely at a taxpayer who moves from California, and often they are high income taxpayers who have large amounts of income after they change their residency to another state. However, lower income taxpayers can also be caught in this trap.

Recently, we heard of two examples of clients who want to leave California — but not completely.

Case study #1: High-income taxpayer who is expecting a large capital gain from the sale of very appreciated stock will move out of state. However, he will keep the California home that has been in his family for generations.

Case study #2: Woman moves to a non-tax state, buys a home there, and keeps her California home to which she returns periodically to oversee care of her mother. She has income from both California and the other state.

Each of these taxpayers is in the danger zone. Let’s look at the rules for residence and domicile and apply them to these case studies, as this is the key to being a nonresident.

Residence and domicile

A “resident” is an individual who is:

  • In California for other than a temporary or transitory purpose; or
  • Domiciled in California, but who is outside California for a temporary or transitory
    purpose.

A domicile is the place where an individual has his or her true, fixed, permanent home and principal establishment, and to which place he or she has, whenever absent,the intention of returning. It is the place in which an individual has voluntarily fixed the habitation of self and family, not for a mere special or limited purpose, but with the present intention of making a permanent home, until some unexpected event shall occur to induce an adoption of some other permanent home.(2)

If a person has not changed their domicile, they continue to be California residents for income tax purposes, even if they are outside of California for most or all of the year.

Don’t keep the house

The key to these case studies is domicile. In order to be a nonresident of California for tax purposes, the taxpayer must show that their domicile is in another state. The FTB will assume any taxpayer that left the state but kept a home in California has retained their California domicile (because they “intend to return”). So, that is one big step against the taxpayer.

In case study #1, the taxpayer must dispose of the property or they will have trouble proving they ended the residency. This is going to be a particularly difficult situation because the taxpayer has significant income from the sale of his appreciated stock, and the FTB will argue that he is only trying to change his residence to avoid the California tax on that income. We would typically recommend that the taxpayer sell their California residence and purchase a residence in their new home state. However, the taxpayer does not want to sell his home because it has been in the family for generations.

Simply having the children rent the family home will make it hard to prevail, as the FTB may argue that the taxpayer can return to the home at any time. One suggestion might be to gift the home to the children or put the home in an irrevocable trust for the children.

In case study #2, the taxpayer has relatively low income, but the FTB is still likely to find that she continues to be a California resident. Keeping the home here indicates that she intends to return to California, especially if she is periodically using it and working occasionally in California. If the FTB audits her, she will surely lose. The best way for her to end her residency is to sell the home and not work in California when she comes to care for her mother. She can stay with friends or in a hotel, but not in her home.

Cases where taxpayers won and lost

A good way to understand factors that will help or hurt taxpayers in these situations is to review cases where taxpayers have lost on residency issues.

Losers

In the Appeal of Murray, the taxpayers were domiciled in California prior to the husband signing with the Cleveland Cavaliers.(3) The Board ruled in favor of the FTB, and found that the taxpayer maintained a domicile in California because the taxpayer and his family resided in Ohio only during the seven-month basketball season. They maintained two homes in California — one occupied by his mother-in-law and the other presumably vacant — and continued to use financial advisors, doctors, and had business registrations in California.

In Appeal of Cummings, the taxpayers had moved to Nevada — or so they thought.(4) However, they retained two homes in California and one in Reno, Nevada. Credit card transactions and amounts and locations of expenses for each spouse demonstrated an overwhelming presence in California. Following all trips, the Cummings always returned to their California location. The Board found that the taxpayers were still California residents.

In Appeal of Norton, the taxpayers, contemplating retirement, began construction of a residence in California and listed their Connecticut homes for sale.(5) In February 1990, they rented a small apartment in California and lived in it until their new home was finished. The Board determined that residency began on April 10, 1990, when the taxpayers moved much of their furniture, including a piano that had been kept in storage, and brought one of their vehicles to California.

Winners

In Appeal of Lau,(6) which was dismissed by the FTB before the BOE made a decision, the Board was posed to rule in favor of taxpayers who had retired from running their California business and had moved to Nevada. Due to the poor housing market, they had retained their California home along with its custom made furnishings, kept their Kaiser health plan, their golf membership (which they were unable to sell), and cars in California to use while they were visiting family and checking in on their business interests. The Board indicated that they felt that the taxpayers had demonstrated their intent to establish a Nevada domicile.

In Appeal of Bills,(7) taxpayers allowed their adult daughter to stay in their California home and purchased another home in Washington to move into when the husband retired from his investment company. The BOE ruled that the taxpayers had established a Washington domicile in only one week, even though they made frequent and extended stays in California immediately thereafter. The Board emphasized the subjective intent test rather than a quantitative objective test in establishing domicile.

1. www.sfgate.com/expensive-san-francisco/article/move-out-of-bay-area-california-where-to-go-cost-13614119.php
2 18 Cal. Code Regs. §17014(c)
3 May 22, 2013, Cal. St. Bd. of Equal., Case No. 469418
4 Appeal of Nicholas and Dorothy Cummings (October 7, 1999) Cal. St. Bd. of Equal., Case No. 98A-1239
5 Thomas H. Paine and Teresa A. Norton (October 7, 1999) Cal. St. Bd. of Equal., Case No. 98A-0741
6 Appeal of Lau, Cal. St. Bd. of Equal., No. 739838, heard March 25, 2015, dismissed May 7, 2015
7 Appeal of Bills (April 28, 2016) Cal. St. Bd. of Equal., Case Nos. 610028, 782397

This article is reprinted with permission of Spidell Publishing, Inc.® ©2019